Corona-Virus | Bildquelle: Bild von Pete Linforth auf Pixabay

USA:

Corona: Erster Mensch weltweit mit Corona-Impfstoff geimpft!

Stand: 17.03.20 15:37 Uhr

Als erster Mensch weltweit ist ein Freiwilliger in den USA mit einem neu entwickelten Corona-Impfstoff geimpft worden! Lesen Sie hier alles Weitere:

Als erster Mensch weltweit ist ein Freiwilliger in den USA mit einem neu entwickelten Corona-Impfstoff geimpft worden! In den nächsten 6 Wochen sollen insgesamt 45 weitere freiwillige Testpersonen dem Impfstoff erhalten. Das teilte die zuständige US-amerikanische Aufsichtsbehörde NIAID gestern - 16.03.2020 - mit.

Die Testreihe findet am Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute (KPWHRI) in Seattle statt. Mit der Testreihe soll die Sicherheit des Impfstoffs erprobt werden. Außerdem soll festgestellt werden, ob der Impfstoff bei den Testpersonen zur erwarteten Immunanwort führt!

Der Einsatz des Impfstoff für klinische Versuche am Menschen wurde vom NIAID, dem "National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases" im "fast-track"-Verfahren unter Auslassung der sonst strikt vorgeschriebenen Tierversuche genehmigt.

Für unsere medizinisch interessierten Leser:

Lesen Sie hier die komplette NIAID-Pressemitteilung nebnst Fragen & Antworten zur Studie  in Englischer Sprache: 

 


 

NIH Clinical Trial of Investigational Vaccine for COVID-19 Begins

Study Enrolling Seattle-Based Healthy Adult Volunteers

March 16, 2020

Adults in the Seattle area who are interested in joining this study should visit https://corona.kpwashingtonresearch.org/ . People who live outside of this region will not be eligible to participate in this trial.

Read the Related Questions & Answers

3D print of a spike protein of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19—in front of a 3D print of a SARS-CoV-2 virus particle. The spike protein (foreground) enables the virus to enter and infect human cells. On the virus model, the virus surface (blue) is covered with spike proteins (red) that enable the virus to enter and infect human cells. For more information, visit the NIH 3D Print Exchange at 3dprint.nih.gov.

Credit: NIH

A Phase 1 clinical trial evaluating an investigational vaccine designed to protect against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has begun at Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute (KPWHRI) in Seattle. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, is funding the trial. KPWHRI is part of NIAID's Infectious Diseases Clinical Research Consortium. The open-label trial will enroll 45 healthy adult volunteers ages 18 to 55 years over approximately 6 weeks. The first participant received the investigational vaccine today.

The study is evaluating different doses of the experimental vaccine for safety and its ability to induce an immune response in participants. This is the first of multiple steps in the clinical trial process for evaluating the potential benefit of the vaccine.

The vaccine is called mRNA-1273 and was developed by NIAID scientists and their collaborators at the biotechnology company Moderna, Inc., based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) supported the manufacturing of the vaccine candidate for the Phase 1 clinical trial.

"Finding a safe and effective vaccine to prevent infection with SARS-CoV-2 is an urgent public health priority," said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. "This Phase 1 study, launched in record speed, is an important first step toward achieving that goal."

Infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, can cause a mild to severe respiratory illness and include symptoms of fever, cough and shortness of breath. COVID-19 cases were first identified in December 2019 in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. As of March 15, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) has reported 153,517 cases of COVID-19 and 5,735 deaths worldwide. More than 2,800 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 58 deaths have been reported in the United States as of March 15, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Currently, no approved vaccines exist to prevent infection with SARS-CoV-2.

The investigational vaccine was developed using a genetic platform called mRNA (messenger RNA). The investigational vaccine directs the body's cells to express a virus protein that it is hoped will elicit a robust immune response. The mRNA-1273 vaccine has shown promise in animal models, and this is the first trial to examine it in humans.

Scientists at NIAID's Vaccine Research Center (VRC) and Moderna were able to quickly develop mRNA-1273 because of prior studies of related coronaviruses that cause severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). Coronaviruses are spherical and have spikes protruding from their surface, giving the particles a crown-like appearance. The spike binds to human cells, allowing the virus to gain entry. VRC and Moderna scientists already were working on an investigational MERS vaccine targeting the spike, which provided a head start for developing a vaccine candidate to protect against COVID-19. Once the genetic information of SARS-CoV-2 became available, the scientists quickly selected a sequence to express the stabilized spike protein of the virus in the existing mRNA platform.

The Phase 1 trial is led by Lisa A. Jackson, M.D., senior investigator at KPWHRI. Study participants will receive two doses of the vaccine via intramuscular injection in the upper arm approximately 28 days apart. Each participant will be assigned to receive a 25 microgram (mcg), 100 mcg or 250 mcg dose at both vaccinations, with 15 people in each dose cohort. The first four participants will receive one injection with the low dose, and the next four participants will receive the 100 mcg dose. Investigators will review safety data before vaccinating the remaining participants in the 25 and 100 mcg dose groups and before participants receive their second vaccinations. Another safety review will be done before participants are enrolled in the 250 mcg cohort.

Participants will be asked to return to the clinic for follow-up visits between vaccinations and for additional visits across the span of a year after the second shot. Clinicians will monitor participants for common vaccination symptoms, such as soreness at the injection site or fever as well as any other medical issues. A protocol team will meet regularly to review safety data, and a safety monitoring committee will also periodically review trial data and advise NIAID. Participants also will be asked to provide blood samples at specified time points, which investigators will test in the laboratory to detect and measure the immune response to the experimental vaccine.

"This work is critical to national efforts to respond to the threat of this emerging virus," Dr. Jackson said. "We are prepared to conduct this important trial because of our experience as an NIH clinical trials center since 2007."

Adults in the Seattle area who are interested in joining this study should visit https://corona.kpwashingtonresearch.org/. For more information about the study, visit ClinicalTrials.gov and search identifier NCT04283461.

Who is conducting the study, and where is it being conducted?

The study is being funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, and conducted at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute (KPWHRI) in Seattle. KPWHRI is part of NIAID's Infectious Disease Clinical Research Consortium (IDCRC), a clinical trials network that encompasses the Institute's long-standing Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units (VTEUs). Lisa A. Jackson, M.D., senior investigator at the Kaiser Institute in Seattle, will lead the study. The IDCRC was designed to respond to public health emergencies by rapidly testing candidate vaccines, diagnostics, therapeutics and other interventions in clinical trials.

Can you describe the experimental vaccine that is being tested?

The investigational vaccine, called mRNA-1273, was developed by scientists at NIAID's Vaccine Research Center in collaboration with the biotechnology company Moderna, Inc., based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Coalition for the Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) supported the clinical manufacturing of the experimental vaccine for this clinical trial.

The experimental vaccine was developed using a genetic platform called mRNA (messenger RNA), which directs the body's cells to express a virus protein that, hopefully, will elicit a robust immune response. The mRNA-1273 vaccine has been tested in animal models and has demonstrated some protective ability.

How were scientists able to develop the experimental vaccine so quickly?

Prior to the COVID-19 outbreak, NIAID and Moderna scientists had been working together on an investigational vaccine to protect against Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), another type of coronavirus. Once the genetic sequence information for the novel SARS-CoV-2 virus became available, the scientists were able to apply that to the existing mRNA platform to create the investigational mRNA-1273 vaccine.

Describe the study design.

It is a Phase 1 clinical trial designed to evaluate different doses of the investigational mRNA-1273 vaccine for safety and their ability to induce an immune response in study volunteers. A Phase 1 study is the first step in testing an experimental vaccine in humans to evaluate its potential benefit.

The study is expected to enroll 45 healthy adult volunteers ages 18 to 55 years of age. Study participants will receive two doses of the experimental vaccine via intramuscular injection in the upper arm 28 days apart. Each participant will be assigned to receive a 25 microgram (mcg), 100 mcg or 250 mcg dose at both vaccinations, with 15 participants in each dose cohort. The first four participants will receive one injection with the low dose, and the next four participants will receive the 100 mcg dose. Investigators will review safety data before vaccinating the remaining participants in the 25 and 100 mcg dose groups and before participants receive their second vaccinations. Another safety review will be conducted before participants are enrolled in the 250 mcg cohort.

Participants will be asked to return to the study clinic for follow-up visits between vaccinations and for additional visits over a year after the second vaccination. Participants will also be asked to provide blood samples at specified times throughout the trial, which scientists will test to detect and measure the immune response to the experimental vaccine.

When will study results be available?

If the clinical trial enrolls participants as planned, researchers hope to have initial data from the clinical trial within three months.

If the study data is favorable, would the mRNA-1273 be made available to the public to protect against the COVID-19 outbreak?

If the investigational vaccine shows promise, the next step will involve larger studies enrolling hundreds to thousands of people to better understand the vaccine candidate's safety and immunogenicity, as well as to see if the experimental vaccine can protect people from infection with the virus that causes COVID-19. It is important to note that a COVID-19 vaccine will not be widely available to the public for at least a year and likely longer. Clinical testing to establish a vaccine's safety and efficacy takes time.

Seattle, which is where the study is being conducted, has had confirmed cases of COVID-19. How can you be sure that study participants have not been exposed to or infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus?

The Seattle site was chosen before the U.S. had identified any cases, and experts could not predict if and where community transmission would occur in the United States. Importantly, study volunteers will be screened for any indication of illness and will not be enrolled in the study if they have active infection, including any signs or symptoms of COVID-19 or any known recent exposure to COVID-19. Also, participants will be enrolled gradually, starting with the low dose (25 mcg), and will be monitored closely for safety concerns. The first four participants will receive one injection with the low dose, and the next four participants will receive the 100 mcg dose.

Investigations will review safety data before vaccinating the remaining participants in the 25 and 100 mcg dose groups and before participants receive their second vaccinations. Another safety review will be done before participants are enrolled in the 250 mcg cohort. In addition, participants will be counseled about how to prevent spread of and avoid infection with SARS-CoV-2 as part of the study procedures.

How will the safety of the study participants be monitored?

Clinical staff will monitor study participants for common vaccination symptoms, such as soreness at the injection site or fever, as well as any other medical issues. A protocol team will meet regularly to review safety data, and a safety monitoring committee will also periodically review trial data and advise NIAID.

 


 

WERBUNG:
Dienstag, 23. Februar 2021
14:22 Lockerung oder Verschärfung? Kretschmann und Lucha zur aktuellen Corona-Situation
Bei der Regierungspressekonferenz sprachen Ministerpräsident Winfried Kretschmann und Gesundheitsminister Manne Lucha über die aktuelle Corona-Situation. Insbesondere die Themen Impfreihenfolge, Teststrategien und mögliche Lockerungen kamen dabei auf den Tisch. [Weiterlesen]

10:15 CureVac produziert bereits Corona-Impfstoff
Das Biotechunternehmen CureVac aus Tübingen stellt bereits große Mengen seines Corona-Impfstoffes her. [Weiterlesen]
Donnerstag, 18. Februar 2021
22:16 Berlins Regierender Bürgermeister will Impfreihenfolge ändern
Berlins Regierender Bürgermeister Michael Müller hat sich dafür ausgesprochen die Impfreihenfolge anzupassen. Hintergrund: Bundesweit wurden Hunderttausende ausgelieferte Astrazenca-Dosen nicht verimpft - weil ihn viele nicht wollen. Müller will den Impfstoff nun anderen geben. [Weiterlesen]

12:41 Forscher der Uni Hamburg: Coronavirus war Laborunfall
Der Hamburger Nanowissenschaftler Prof. Roland Wiesendanger forscht zum Ursprung des Coronavirus. Sein Ergebnis: Es war ein Laborunfall am virologischen Institut der chinesischen Stadt Wuhan. Lesen Sie Auszüge aus der Studie. [Weiterlesen]

10:49 Oberbürgermeister appellieren an Merkel: Innenstadtbezirke sollen wieder öffnen dürfen
Tübingens Oberbürgermeister Boris Palmer hat sich zusammen mit den Oberbürgermeistern von Schwäbisch Gmünd (Richard Arnold) und Schorndorf (Matthias Klopfer) in einem Brief an Bundeskanzlerin Angela Merkel, Finanzminister Olaf Scholz und Ministerpräsident Winfried Kretschmann gewandt. [Weiterlesen]
Freitag, 12. Februar 2021
14:09 Zulassungsverfahren für CureVac Impfstoff startet
Das Tübinger Biotech-Unternehmen CureVac hat bei der Europäischen Arzneimittelagentur (EMA) ein rollierendes Zulassungsverfahren für seinen Covid-Impfstoff-Kandidaten gestartet. [Weiterlesen]
Donnerstag, 11. Februar 2021
16:03 Wie ist die Pandemielage? Und wie sieht es bei den Impfungen aus?
Wie ist die aktuelle Coronalage im Landkreis Reutlingen? Wie laufen die Impfungen bei den Risikogruppen? Darüber hat Landrat Thomas Reumann bei einer Pressekonferenz informiert. [Weiterlesen]

15:05 Lockdown verlängert - Kretschmann zu den Beschlüssen der Ministerpräsidentenkonferenz
Gestern traf sich Bundeskanzlerin Angela Merkel mit den Ministerpräsidenten der Länder, um sich über neue Corona-Maßnahmen zu beraten. Im Anschluss daran gab Ministerpräsident Kretschmann ein Statement dazu ab, was bei der Beratung besprochen wurde. [Weiterlesen]

01:19 Stuttgarter dürfen über Nacht draußen bleiben: Inzidenz fällt gerade noch rechtzeitig unter 50
Die Stuttgarter dürfen offenbar auch nach 21 Uhr draußen bleiben: Gerade noch rechtzeitig zum Beginn der neuen Ausgangssperren-Regelung unterschreitet Stuttgart die rote 50er-Inzidenz-Linie. Zuvor hatte die Inzidenz noch 50,3 betragen. [Weiterlesen]
Samstag, 30. Januar 2021
09:35 Viele Azubis können Corona-Lernlücken schwer schließen
Das Corona-Virus wirkt sich auf vielen Ebenen auf das Berufsleben aus. Auch Auszubildende sind betroffen - vor allem, weil Präsenzveranstaltungen weitgehend ausfallen. [Weiterlesen]
Freitag, 29. Januar 2021
22:14 Deutschland erlässt kurzfristig Einreisestopp
Zum Schutz vor hochansteckenden Mutationen des Coronavirus erlässt Deutschland einen Einreistopp: Aus Großbritannien, Irland, Portugal, Südafrika und Brasilien darf man ab Samstag nur in Ausnahmefällen einreisen. [Weiterlesen]

16:26 Stoch: "Eltern und Schulen brauchen Perspektiven"
Den 22. Februar sollte sich das Land dann wirklich als Ziel setzen, die Schulen und Kitas schrittweise zu öffnen. Das findet der SPD-Spitzenkandidat Andreas Stoch. Allerdings sollte das nicht ohne Konzepte geschehen. [Weiterlesen]

14:44 Zunächst keine Öffnung - Kitas und Grundschulen bleiben weiterhin geschlossen
Grundschulen und Kitas bleiben weiterhin geschlossen und öffnen nicht wie geplant bereits Anfang Februar. Dies gab Ministerpräsident Winfried Kretschmann in einem Statement am gestrigen Donnerstagabend bekannt. Den Grund für diese Entscheidung und wie es weitergehen soll, erfahren Sie jetzt. [Weiterlesen]
Donnerstag, 28. Januar 2021
09:16 Eisenmann für frühere Impfung von Lehr- und Erziehungskräften
Kultusministerin Dr. Susanne Eisenmann hat sich Medienberichten zufolge dafür ausgesprochen, dass Lehr- und Erziehungskräfte früher geimpft werden. [Weiterlesen]
Sonntag, 24. Januar 2021
16:03 Maskenpflicht, Home-Office und Hundesalons - Neue Corona-Regelungen treten am Montag in Kraft
Ab dem morgigen Montag treten die von Bund und Ländern beschlossenen neuen Corona-Regeln in Kraft. So wird die Maskenpflicht erweitert und verschärft. Beim Einkaufen, im ÖPNV, in Pflegeheimen, Krankenhäusern und Arztpraxen müssen dann medizinische Masken getragen werden. [Weiterlesen]
Montag, 18. Januar 2021
17:47 Corona-Pandemie schlägt Pflegeheimbewohnern aufs Gemüt
In der Corona-Pandemie haben sich Lebensfreude und geistige Fähigkeiten von Seniorenheim-Bewohnern offenbar deutlich verschlechtert. Das ergab eine Studie, für die das Zentrum für Qualität in der Pflege deutschlandweit knapp 2.000 Mitarbeiter von Heimen und ambulanten Diensten befragt hat. [Weiterlesen]

11:29 So schützen FFP2-Masken am besten - Fälschung erkennen, richtig tragen
Ab heute gilt eine FFP2-Maskenpflicht in Bayern, für ganz Deutschland wird sie diskutiert. Worauf muss man achten, mit oder ohne Ventil, wie schützen sie am besten vor Corona? Alle Infos. [Weiterlesen]

10:22 Verlängerung der Corona-Maßnahmen bis Mitte Februar vorstellbar
Bundesfinanzminister Olaf Scholz (SPD) kann sich vorstellen, dass die Corona-Maßnahmen bis Mitte Februar verlängert werden. Auf Unternehmen will er mehr Druck in Sachen Homeoffice machen. [Weiterlesen]
Freitag, 15. Januar 2021
09:51 Boris Palmer kritisiert Schul- und Kita-Schließung
Der Tübinger Oberbürgermeister Boris Palmer (Grüne) hat die Schul- und Kitaschließungen wegen der Corona-Pandemie kritisiert. "Eine Gruppe, die selber von Corona kaum betroffen ist, trägt eine der größten Lasten der Pandemie-Abwehr. Das scheint mir nicht verhältnismäßig zu sein." [Weiterlesen]
Donnerstag, 14. Januar 2021
20:02 Regierung prüft Lockdown-Hammer: Kein Nahverkehr, Homeoffice-Pflicht, Ausgangssperre
Bundeskanzlerin Merkel will den Corona-Lockdown offenbar massiv verschärfen: So wird laut Medienberichten geprüft, den Nahverkehr mit Bus und Bahn komplett einzustellen. Auch eine Homeoffice-Pflicht und eine ganztägige Ausgangssperre sind im Gespräch. [Weiterlesen]




Seitenanzeige: